Alejandra C. Salinas
Associate
Houston Office Phone: (713) 653-7802 Email Download vCard Print Bio to PDF
Education

Boston College Law School (J.D., cum laude, 2015)

The University of Texas at Austin (B.B.A., Management, 2012)

Judicial Clerkship

Law Clerk to the Chief Judge Sidney R. Thomas, United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, 2015-2016

Alejandra C. Salinas
Associate

Named one of Houston’s “Top Women in Law” by The National Diversity Council, Alejandra Salinas represents plaintiffs and defendants in complex and high-stakes commercial litigation. Salinas has successfully faced off against industry titans, including global media and technology conglomerates. Her client list ranges from large Fortune 500 retail and energy companies, to small businesses and individuals.

Like her client list, Salinas’ litigation experience is diverse. She has tried cases involving complex patent infringement and trade secret claims, constitutional rights, unfair business competition, and multi-million-dollar oil and gas disputes. The common thread that remains is Salinas’ ability to master complex subject matter and distill it into compelling and easily digestible facts and arguments for judges and juries.

Salinas plays a pivotal role in every case she takes on. Some of her most significant cases include:

WickFire LLC v. TriMax Media LLC et al., where Salinas helped defeat a $22 million claim for tortious interference and secured a $2.3 million jury verdict for her client on its affirmative claims. At trial, Salinas took the lead on the direct examination of Wickfire’s damages expert addressing both plaintiff’s damages and defendant’s counterclaim damages.  Concerning Salinas’ trial performance, one Susman Godfrey partner is quoted as saying “Alejandra knocked it out of the park.

Mirada v. Oasis, where Salinas represented Mirada Energy against Oasis Petroleum for breach of Mirada’s contractual right to participate in Oasis’s construction and operation of midstream facilities in North Dakota. Salinas led several critical depositions and discovery hearings and the case settled favorably on confidential terms.

Confidential Patent Dispute Arbitration, where Salinas tried an eight-figure arbitration against a global semiconductor chip manufacturer and delivered a compelling opening argument. Salinas also helped secure earlier favorable settlements against other global semiconductor chip manufacturers.

Salinas also dedicates many hours each year to pro bono work, including helping to secure a settlement with Magnolia ISD to eliminate its discriminatory hair policy, helping to secure an injunction on constitutional grounds in a class action attacking unaffordable bail in the nation’s third largest county, co-drafting a Supreme Court amicus brief in a political gerrymandering case, and successfully arguing an immigration case before the 9th circuit whereby the client was able to remain in the county.

Before joining the firm, Salinas addressed 20,000 delegates on the final night of the Democratic National Convention in 2012 in a nationally televised speech. Salinas has appeared on various state and national media outlets including USA Today, MTV, NBC, CNN, Politico, LawdragonTeen Vogue, Univision, Telemundo, NPR, Houston ChronicleSan Antonio Express, and Los Angeles Times. She has also traveled to U.S. embassies around the world on behalf of the U.S. State Department to speak about the Latino community and national political parties.

Salinas is an active Board Member for Second Mile Haiti, an organization whose mission is to fight childhood malnutrition and improve outcomes for impoverished women and children in Haiti.

Honors and Recognitions

Rising Star, Texas Super Lawyers (2022, Thomson Reuters)

Young Lawyer Representative, Diversity.Advanced Committee, American Bar Association Antitrust Law Section (2022)

Future Leader – LGBT + Equality, Chambers USA (2019)

One of Houston’s “Top Women in Law” by The National Diversity Council (2017)

Articles

“Cleaning Up The Colonias: Municipal Annexation and the Texas Fracking Boom,” 42 Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review 163 (2015)